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Policy Issues

Read more about NNEDV’s federal policy priorities, legislative history, and recommendations to the current Administration.

  • Victims of Crime Act

    US Capitol building

    The Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) Fund was created by Congress in 1984 to provide federal support to state and local programs that assist victims of crime. VOCA uses non-taxpayer money from the Crime Victims Fund (CVF) for programs that serve victims of crime, including state-formula victim assistance grants.

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  • Family Violence Prevention and Services Act

    US Capitol building

    The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) supports lifesaving services for victims of domestic violence and their children. First authorized in 1984, FVPSA is the only federal funding source dedicated to domestic violence shelters and programs.

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  • Violence Against Women Act

    US Capitol building

    The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) creates and supports comprehensive, cost-effective responses to domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking. Since its enactment in 1994, VAWA programs have dramatically improved federal, tribal, state, and local responses to these crimes.

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  • Funding & Appropriations

    Federal funding for VAWA, VOCA, and FVPSA has enhanced federal, tribal, state and local responses to domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking, and supported lifesaving emergency shelters and services for domestic violence victims and other crime victims. Increased funding is essential to ensure that programs across the country can keep the lights on, answer crisis calls, and provide essential services for victims fleeing violence.

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  • Technology Policy

    Technology has a major impact on survivors of abuse. It can be used by a victim to access help, to strategically maintain safety and privacy, and to remain connected to family and friends. It is often used to prove guilt and hold offenders accountable. Yet, technology, in its various forms, is also misused by abusers […]

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  • Policies Impacting Children, Youth, & Young Adults

    Sad woman listening to melancholic music and looking up, sitting on the pavement.

    Young people are affected by dating and domestic violence as both victims and witnesses. Victim service providers who primarily serve adults often lack the resources and expertise to address the unique needs of young people. However, policy solutions fostering prevention and intervention efforts can provide invaluable education and services for young people.

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  • Healthcare Policy

    Survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault need a range of physical and mental health services, including preventive care, in order to heal and thrive. We encourage Congress to maintain access for all to high-quality, comprehensive health insurance that is guaranteed and affordable. Access to necessary medical and behavioral health services: Victims of violence and […]

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  • Immigration Policy

    USA Flag on dark wood background

    Immigrant victims of domestic violence – whether documented or undocumented – face a number of barriers when seeking safety and justice. While VAWA has taken steps to improve assistance to and services for immigrant victims of domestic violence, other federal immigration policies often drive victims further into the shadows.

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  • VAWA 2013 Reauthorization

    US Capitol building

    While the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) has undoubtedly improved our nation’s response to violence, not all victims had been protected or reached through earlier iterations of the bill. VAWA 2013, signed into law by President Obama on March 7, 2013, closed critical gaps in services and justice. It reauthorized and improved upon lifesaving services for all victims […]

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  • Policies to Prevent Domestic Violence Homicides

    gun

    Every day in the United States, women are killed or severely injured due to the lethal combination of domestic violence abusers and guns. When abusers have access to firearms, not only women’s safety, but their very lives, are in danger.

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  • The Next Steps to Ending Domestic Violence: 100 Day and Ongoing Recommendations for the Biden-Harris Transition Team

    The Biden-Harris Administration must use a government-wide, coordinated strategy to reduce gender-based violence during this challenging time.

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  • NNEDV’s Legislative Priorities for the 117th Congress

    US Capitol Building with reflecting pond

    The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) is excited to share our Priorities for the 117th Congress.

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  • Economic Justice Policy

    Image of U.S. dollars

    Personal safety and economic security are inextricably linked for victims of domestic violence. When survivors of domestic violence have stable access to resources that help them build economic resiliency, they and their families are much more likely to remain safe and secure.

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  • Housing Policy

    Rowhouses and blue sky

    16 Things You May Not Know About Housing Policy Legislative Policies and Action Issue Overview Domestic violence and sexual assault are significant contributors to family homelessness and serve as both a cause and an outcome of housing instability.1 Survivors of domestic violence often must flee their homes to escape life-threatening violence. Victims of domestic violence are […]

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  • The Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization Of 2013: Housing Protections (Section 601)

    Rowhouses and blue sky

    Learn more about how VAWA 2013 builds on landmark housing protections included in VAWA 2005 for survivors in federally-subsidized housing units/programs.

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  • Confidentiality

    Crowd of people in street

    Victims of domestic violence are at greatest risk of homicide at the point of separation or after leaving their violent partner [i]. Research shows that most individuals (87% of the U.S. population) have characteristics that likely make them unique based only on 5-digit ZIP, gender, and date of birth [ii]. It is essential that victims […]

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