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Economic Justice

Ninety-nine percent of victims of domestic violence experience financial abuse. [1] For many survivors of domestic violence, the journey toward economic stability can be an uphill challenge.

NNEDV’s Economic Justice project was founded to respond to, address, and prevent financial abuse. We work to:

  • Strengthen victim advocates’ financial capabilities to better assist survivors of domestic violence moving from short-term safety to long-term security. Using the Moving Ahead through Financial Management curriculum, we employ our signature Train-the-Trainer approach to deliver financial literacy lessons to victim advocates across the United States through our network of state and territory domestic violence coalitions and their local member programs.
  • Support survivors of domestic violence in rebuilding credit scores damanged as a result of financial abuse through our Independence Project.
  • Inform advocates about personal finance tools, resources, and the most recent research available in the field of financial literacy and capability through NNEDV’s exclusive listservs and newsletters.

[NEW!] The Independence Project

In partnership with Verizon Wireless and with seed funding from Thirty-One Gifts, NNEDV launched the Independence Project, a credit-building program for survivors of domestic violence. Because many survivors experience financial abuse, credit building micro-loans are an important tool to help survivors improve their credit scores. A higher credit score can increase a survivors’ access to a range of economic resources, including lower interest credit cards and loans.

Learn more about the Independence Project here.

Moving Ahead

In partnership with The Allstate Foundation and the U.S. state and territorial coalitions against domestic violence, NNEDV’s Economic Justice Project delivers financial literacy information with tools like the Moving Ahead Through Financial Management curriculum, webinars, and grants that support economic justice and empowerment programs for survivors of abuse.

Since 2005, NNEDV’s Economic Justice Project has coordinated and provided technical assistance for the following Allstate Foundation grant programs:

  • The Moving Ahead Through Financial Management Curriculum Grant Program provides curriculum materials and funding to state coalitions that work with local programs to train advocates in their state.
  • The Moving Ahead Economic Empowerment Grant Program has awarded over $2 million to state domestic violence coalitions to help survivors move from short-term safety to long-term security, research economic abuse, and support new services. Grant focus areas include matched savings programs, financial education, micro-enterprise, and job readiness programs.

Technical Assistance and Online Resource Platform

We deliver financial literacy and economic justice resources and information to our members and the general public through our website, exclusive listservs, webinars, trainings, and one-on-one consultations.

We also compile and organize relevant research on a wide range of financial literacy topics and engage in a variety of outreach activities to help give survivors a voice with financial education stakeholders at the national level. This project is greatly enhanced through the ongoing commitment of dedicated partners who understand the importance of ending domestic violence through financial education and independence.

[1] Adams, Adrienne E. “Measuring the Effects of Domestic Violence on Women’s Financial Well-being.” CFS Research Brief 2011-5.6.