National Network to End Domestic Violence Official Website

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October 17, 2013

Last week, Facebook announced that they were removing the “Who Can Look Up My Timeline By Name” option for their users. Although we are disappointed that the option to be searched by name has been removed, the safest course for survivors and advocates is to educate themselves about how they can be found on Facebook. Check out the full story on the Tech Safety blog.

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October 15, 2013

Over the past 3 months, the WomensLaw project has been hard at work adding information to WomensLaw.org. Check out the latest additions:

• We added new information about housing protections in Connecticut for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. See our CT Housing Laws section for more information.

• We are thrilled to announce that we have created new Crimes pages for all states and territories. You can now go to your state's Crimes page to read the definitions of a selection of crimes in your state that the abuser may have committed and you can find links to victim compensation programs in each state.

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October 4, 2013

Ensuring that victims of domestic violence have access to safe, affordable housing is a priority for NNEDV, and we lead national efforts toward this goal. Our work secured expanded landmark housing protection in the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) renewal in March 2013. VAWA protects victims who live in a range of federally subsidized housing programs from evictions based on the actions of their abusers and has created pathways for transferring to safer housing.

To turn the letter of the law into a reality for victims, NNEDV is engaged in ongoing work with key stakeholders and the Administration. This “implementation” work is a continual effort that is essential in shaping the law’s impact on survivors in danger. Recently, we were invited to participate, as part of a select group of invitees, in listening sessions with White House officials and other federal officials charged with implementing VAWA’s housing protections. NNEDV will continue to lead the implementation strategy to ensure that every survivor in federally subsidized housing can stay safely housed.

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October 1, 2013

The level of uncertainty for domestic violence victims and the programs that serve them increased today, this first day of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, as the federal government shut down due to an unfinished funding bill.

Domestic violence victims often rely on government supports to maintain their safety and economic stability in times of crisis. For instance, many victims of domestic violence depend on safety net benefits, like the federally-funded Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF) program. This and other federally-supported benefits are threatened by a government shutdown that lasts more than a few days.

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September 23, 2013

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, or DVAM, and NNEDV is celebrating by sharing 31 things you can do to help create a world where domestic violence doesn't exist -- one for every day of the month!

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September 15, 2013

This past Friday marked the 19th anniversary of the passing of the original Violence Against Women Act. To mark the occasion, NNEDV would like to share the following blog post by Lynn Rosenthal, White House Advisor on Violence Against Women:

Ending Violence Against Women: 19 Years of Progress

Originally posted by Lynn Rosenthal on September 13, 2013 at 01:32 PM EDT on The White House blog 

Today marks the 19th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). As the original author and champion of VAWA, Vice President Biden brought national attention to what had too-long been a hidden problem. Then-Senator Biden held the first hearing on violence against women in the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1990 and introduced the first version of the Act that same year. After five years of hearings exposing the extent of rape, battering and stalking, the Act finally passed Congress and was signed into law by President Clinton on September 13, 1994.

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