National Network to End Domestic Violence Official Website

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July 19, 2017

Financial abuse is one of the most powerful tools an abuser can use to maintain power and control in a relationship, and is present in almost all cases of domestic violence. Both the short- and long-term effects of financial abuse can be devastating for survivors of abuse. A short-term effect, such as limited financial assets renders survivors unable to obtain safe and affordable housing, or provide basic needs for themselves or their children. Long-term, financial abuse can result in ruined credit scores, lack of employment experience, and various legal issues such as identity theft. As a result, achieving financial independence can seem impossible to victims of financial abuse.

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July 12, 2017

The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) congratulates Vanessa Timmons, this year’s recipient of the annual Diane Reese Excellence in Advocacy in the Movement (“DREAM”) Award

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June 27, 2017

NNEDV: First, tell us about yourself – who are you and what do you do?

Chrissy Chambers: My name is Chrissy Chambers and I am a YouTuber, activist and performer.  My girlfriend and I started a YouTube channel in 2012 (BriaAndChrissy) where we make comedy, music, and activism videos.  We try to make entertaining videos that make you laugh and educate you at the same time.  To date, we are the most popular lesbian content creators online.  We try to use this platform for change every day.

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June 14, 2017

On June 15, communities across the United States and around the world recognize World Elder Abuse Awareness Day: an international observance held each year to bring visibility to interpersonal violence experienced by older adults. A serious public health and human rights issue that too often goes ignored, elder abuse can include physical, psychological, or sexual abuse; neglect; and financial exploitation. Since approximately two-thirds of older victims are female, elder abuse is a subset of violence against women. For example, the most extensive national study to-date found that 1 in 10 community-residing older adults reported experiencing at least one form of abuse the previous year—and the majority of cases of physical violence involved female victims with spouses as perpetrators. In addition to being intimate partners, perpetrators of abuse in later life are likely to be family members, paid and unpaid caregivers, and other persons in a relationship where the victim and society expect compassion and caring. Even when the abuser is not an intimate partner, the dynamics of power and control commonly experienced by younger victims and other forms of abuse may be present.

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June 1, 2017

The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) joins the national recognition of Pride Month this June. Every year, countless Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) individuals and allies come together to celebrate one another’s identities; Pride Month is about increasing visibility, equal rights, building community, and celebrating who you are while standing against homophobia, violence, and discrimination.

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May 31, 2017

NNEDV: First, tell us about yourself – who are you and what do you do?

Wynn is from Columbia, Tennessee, but he and his family lived in Texas for ten years with his stepfather. During those years, Wynn witnessed the abuse of his mother by his stepfather and saw police do nothing to intervene. When he became a police officer in Wichita, Kansas, an aspiration that came from his father who was also an officer, he realized that officers weren’t trained to deal with domestic violence, nor did they understand the crime. Wynn was hired at the Nashville Metropolitan Police Department in 1978 and he started teaching in 1982 on best practices for addressing domestic violence. In the early 1990s Wynn became the co-creator of the largest domestic violence unit in history.

Wynn has trained for over forty years in all fifty states and thirteen countries, including China, Russia, and Turkey, for the U.S. State Department. He is married to Valerie, an advocate, therapist, and Founder & Executive Director of the Mary Parrish Center in Nashville, a domestic and sexual violence therapeutic transitional housing program named after Wynn's mother. Wynn has consulted for the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), where he trained Chiefs of Police on how to write and implement policies on domestic violence. For the past thirteen years, he has trained on modern efforts in responding to sexual assault, stalking, and trafficking at the IACP National Institute Leadership on Violence Against Women. Since 2001, Wynn has taught in over 1,000 classrooms and traveled over two million miles to train law enforcement, individuals within the criminal justice system, advocates, and others.

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