National Network to End Domestic Violence Official Website

escape this website SAFETY ALERT: If you are in danger, please use a safer computer, or call 911, a local hotline, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224. Learn more technology safety tips. There is always a computer trail, but you can leave this site quickly.

The National Network to End Domestic Violence. Click to return to the home page.

Text Size:

Action Alerts

Content

News

 Print 

News

September 8, 2017

It has been long established that incidents of sexual assault and dating abuse on campus are unreported or underreported, perpetuating a culture of violence and silence that has threatened students for generations. While Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been clear that she intends to undermine long-standing protections and recent efforts to strengthen Title IX legal protections, once again we hear from the Education Secretary that the current Administration has no intention of assuring students that their safety and best interests are central to the agenda.

Read more...

 Print 

News

August 1, 2017

San Francisco, CA – La Red Nacional para Eliminar la Violencia Doméstica (NNEDV por sus siglas en inglés) está muy emocionada de anunciar el lanzamiento de la versión en español de su app móvil de Seguridad Tecnológica – un recurso para sobrevivientes de acecho o abuso facilitado por la tecnología y también para sus amigos/as, parientes y proveedores/as servicios. Esta app educativa móvil les explica a sus usuarios/as cómo las formas particulares de tecnología pueden ser abusadas para acosarles y acecharles, lo que pueden hacer si les pasa y les ofrece sugerencias para mejorar su seguridad y privacidad con la tecnología.

Read more...

 Print 

News

July 19, 2017

Financial abuse is one of the most powerful tools an abuser can use to maintain power and control in a relationship, and is present in almost all cases of domestic violence. Both the short- and long-term effects of financial abuse can be devastating for survivors of abuse. A short-term effect, such as limited financial assets renders survivors unable to obtain safe and affordable housing, or provide basic needs for themselves or their children. Long-term, financial abuse can result in ruined credit scores, lack of employment experience, and various legal issues such as identity theft. As a result, achieving financial independence can seem impossible to victims of financial abuse.

Read more...

 Print 

News

July 12, 2017

The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) congratulates Vanessa Timmons, this year’s recipient of the annual Diane Reese Excellence in Advocacy in the Movement (“DREAM”) Award

Read more...

 Print 

News

June 27, 2017

NNEDV: First, tell us about yourself – who are you and what do you do?

Chrissy Chambers: My name is Chrissy Chambers and I am a YouTuber, activist and performer.  My girlfriend and I started a YouTube channel in 2012 (BriaAndChrissy) where we make comedy, music, and activism videos.  We try to make entertaining videos that make you laugh and educate you at the same time.  To date, we are the most popular lesbian content creators online.  We try to use this platform for change every day.

Read more...

 Print 

News

June 14, 2017

On June 15, communities across the United States and around the world recognize World Elder Abuse Awareness Day: an international observance held each year to bring visibility to interpersonal violence experienced by older adults. A serious public health and human rights issue that too often goes ignored, elder abuse can include physical, psychological, or sexual abuse; neglect; and financial exploitation. Since approximately two-thirds of older victims are female, elder abuse is a subset of violence against women. For example, the most extensive national study to-date found that 1 in 10 community-residing older adults reported experiencing at least one form of abuse the previous year—and the majority of cases of physical violence involved female victims with spouses as perpetrators. In addition to being intimate partners, perpetrators of abuse in later life are likely to be family members, paid and unpaid caregivers, and other persons in a relationship where the victim and society expect compassion and caring. Even when the abuser is not an intimate partner, the dynamics of power and control commonly experienced by younger victims and other forms of abuse may be present.

Read more...