National Network to End Domestic Violence Official Website

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The National Network to End Domestic Violence. Click to return to the home page.

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President & CEO

Kim A. Gandy currently serves as the president and CEO of the National Network to End Domestic Violence. From her years as a young activist in her native Louisiana, to her work prosecuting violent offenders, to her energetic participation in the passage of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in 1994, and its reauthorization in 2000 and 2005, Kim has remained profoundly committed to ensuring that women have the opportunity to lead healthy lives in safety and prosperity. Her long career in advocacy, legislative reform and coalition-building includes areas such as violence against women, family law, workplace fairness, poverty and economic issues, and social security. In addition to volunteering at a local shelter, Kim was a founder and director of the New Orleans Metropolitan Battered Women’s Program. She served as an Assistant District Attorney in Orleans Parish, during which time she gained particular insight into the systemic challenges facing survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. In addition to serving domestic violence survivors pro bono in private practice, Kim wrote state legislation addressing women’s concerns, including Louisiana’s first Domestic Abuse Assistance Act in 1983. On the national level, Kim worked closely with then-Senator Joe Biden and then-Congresswoman Barbara Boxer on the passage and funding of VAWA, and helped organize 200,000 people to rally in Washington the following year in a call for the release of VAWA funding, and with Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney for passage and funding of the 2004 Debbie Smith Act, a law that supports the prosecution of criminal offenders and which expanded VAWA legal assistance to include survivors of dating violence. Kim has also worked extensively toward expanded protections from violence for women, including women in the workplace.

Prior to joining NNEDV, Kim was vice president of and general counsel of the Feminist Majority and the Feminist Majority Foundation, where she led their successful campaign to modernize the FBI Uniform Crime Report definition of rape. She spent 22 years as a top leader of the National Organization for Women (NOW), first as national secretary, then executive vice president and finally, president. Kim served on the legislative drafting committees for the Civil Rights Act of 1991 and the 1994 Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act, and during her work with both organizations was a guiding force in many landmark cases and legislative gains, such as the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009. A widely sought-after media commentator, Kim has participated in more than 400 major media interviews with news organizations such as TIME, Newsweek CNN, ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX and NPR, and has appeared on programs including “The Colbert Report,” “Oprah” and “The O’Reilly Factor.” A graduate of Louisiana Tech University with Bachelor of Science degrees in mathematics and education, Kim holds a Juris doctorate degree from Loyola University School of Law.